Jan 20, 2019 12:17 UTC
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May
    British Prime Minister Theresa May

British voters support staying in the European Union (EU) over accepting Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal, says the most recent Opinion poll for the Observer.

This comes after the prime minister's exit plan suffered a historic defeat in the House of Commons on Tuesday.

Given the option of remaining in the EU, a mere 35 percent of the voters said they would back May's deal in another referendum, while 45 percent said they would vote remain.

People who voted to leave the bloc in 2016, however, were more prepared to say they did not know how they would vote. This would suggest a sign of lean towards the deal, bringing the 10-point gap closer when the actual day comes.

A one-sided cancellation of the deal seemed far-fetched, according to the poll. Almost a quarter (26 percent) thinks the government ought to stop the process, whereas 40 percent think the government should proceed with Brexit on the existing schedule, if it comes down to leaving with no deal.

Meanwhile, one in five say the government should delay Brexit to give voters time to weigh the pros and cons of all models. Opinion is split on holding another referendum, with 43 percent supporting and 43 percent opposing the idea.

Labor leads the Tories with the advantage of three points, on the subject of a general election. The former has grossed 40 percent support from the voters, whereas the conservatives are on 37 percent. Only last month, the two sides were tied at 39 percent support.

Approval of May's handling of Brexit has plunged to 24 percent with 57 percent disapproving.

The leader of the opposition, however, has a worse rating on Brexit. A whopping 58 percent disapprove of Jeremy Corbyn’s response to Brexit, while 18 percent support him on the issue. 46 percent of Labor voters back his response on Brexit.

Fifty-eight percent say a better deal than May's could have been achieved. Half of them think it is a bad deal, while only 12 percent has a favorable view of her deal.

The conservative voters have a slightly more appetite towards the deal, according to the poll.

Last December, 47 percent of them said their Members of the Parliament should vote for the deal, while 37 percent thought the deal should be voted down.

The new poll now shows 48 percent of them think their MPs should vote for the deal and 32 percent say they should vote it down.


EA

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