Jul 02, 2022 16:40 UTC
  • Trump pushes for early 2024 announcement as Jan. 6 investigations intensify

Former US President Donald Trump has increased his efforts to confirm an unusually early bid for the White House to counter the ruining impact of revelations unveiled by the Jan. 6 investigation panel scrutinizing him, according to a report.

Republicans close to Trump said he believes a formal announcement of his bid for presidency would boost his chances for re-election in 2024, as well as bolster his claims that the Jan. 6 investigations were politically motivated, The New York Times reported on Friday.

It said Trump would enter the race as the clear front-runner, with an approval rating of around 80 percent

Trump's increased speed of his plans in recent weeks comes just as new details emerge about his indifference to the threat of violence on Jan. 6 and his refusal to act to stop the attack on Capitol Hill.

Earlier this week, former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson testified at a House Select Committee hearing to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol that Trump was repeatedly warned in advance, and on the day of the attack, about the possibility of violence, including from armed individuals at the rally.

The bombshell testimony by Hutchinson offered sound proof about Trump's recklessness, and supported allegations that the Jan. 6 attack was part of a desperate plot devised by the Trump camp to steal a second term of presidency, and that many of his top advisers went along with Trump's plans despite knowing that they were illegal, and the power grab was an act against law.

Meanwhile, presidential candidates in the United States typically announce their candidacies in the year before the election.

A formal announcement from Trump could have immediate implications for Republicans seeking to take control of Congress in November.

Myles Hoenig, an American political analyst and activist, told Press TV that Trump played an active role in determining the fate of the Republican Party.

The midterm elections in November represented a watershed in US politics and could be a make-or-break moment for Trump's future in the party, Hoenig insisted, explaining that Trump's track record of wins or losses in the elections could either serve him well, or put an end to "the nonsense of this candidate", once and for all.

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